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Monday, 26 November 2018

High Heels and the Achilles Tendon

Many women enjoy wearing high heels despite having the knowledge that the feet may be negatively affected. Research has shown the Achilles tendon may become shorter and stiffness may occur as a possible result of frequently wearing high heels. Additionally, balance and posture may become affected as the center of gravity changes, and the muscles surrounding the ankle may be compromised. There may be solutions that can be implemented to protect the feet from wearing high heels, and these may include choosing to wear shoes that have a lower heel, reducing the amount of days and time spent wearing high heels, or wearing soft insoles, which may provide adequate cushioning for the feet. If you would like additional information about the effects high heels can have on your feet, please speak with a podiatrist who will be able to suggest proper foot strengthening exercises.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact one of our podiatrists from Dr. Kane & Associates, P.C. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which parts of my body will be affected by high heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What kinds of foot problems can develop from wearing high heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How can I still wear high heels and maintain foot health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Westland, MI.. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Effect of High Heels on the Feet

The medical condition that is referred to as athlete’s foot will typically affect many different types of people regardless if they are athletes. The tinea fungus is responsible for this uncomfortable ailment and will survive in moist and warm areas. It is known to be extremely contagious, and it often lives in public pools, showers, and surrounding areas. The noticeable symptoms may include cracked and peeling skin between the toes, dry or raw skin on your feet, or an itchy sensation that may affect the entire foot. There may be pre-existing medical conditions that may include diabetes or a weakened immune system, which can contribute to the onset of athlete’s foot. If you feel you may have developed this ailment, it is suggested to seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can perform a proper diagnosis and correct treatment.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with one of our podiatrists from Dr. Kane & Associates, P.C. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms:

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Westland, MI.. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about How to Deal with Athlete's Foot

A medical condition that is known as peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common circulatory concern. Noticeable symptoms of this ailment may include feeling a tingling sensation in your feet, numbness, or coldness in the lower extremities. Some patients experience uncomfortable heaviness in their feet in addition to possible cramping in the legs. These sensations are typically a result of diminished blood flow the body needs, which may cause difficulty in maintaining a daily exercise routine. Research has shown despite the pain that mild exercise may cause, it may be necessary to perform simple movements that may aid in adequate blood flow throughout the body. There are specific activities that can be performed frequently that may increase circulation in the body. These may include walking slowly and consistently in addition to swimming for extended periods of time. If you are experiencing cramping in your feet, it’s advised to speak with a podiatrist to learn about additional ways to improve circulation.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Dr. Kane & Associates, P.C. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms:

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Westland, MI.. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet

Many people experience an uncomfortable foot condition that is referred to as plantar fasciitis. Research has shown there may be effective stretches that can be performed, which may help in relieving a portion of the pain and discomfort that is associated with this ailment. Several patients may notice that the pain in the morning may be worse than the remainder of the day. This may be a result of the plantar fascia not being stretched during the night, and this band of tissue across the bottom of the foot may typically become stiff upon arising. There are several stretches that are effective in helping the pain associated with this condition. These may include sitting on the floor with your legs stretched out in front of you, and your toes pointed upward. When a towel is wrapped around your feet and pulled towards you, a mild stretch across the sole of the feet may be felt. Additionally, it may be beneficial to stretch the Achilles tendon and this may help in strengthening the plantar fascia. This can be accomplished by standing with your hands straight on the wall in front of you, while placing one foot in front of the other and leaning in slowly toward the wall. It’s important to hold this position for thirty seconds, followed by repeating on the other side. If you would like additional information on how to perform proper foot stretches, please consult with a podiatrist.

Why Stretching is Important for Your Feet

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with one of our podiatrists from Dr. Kane & Associates, P.C. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first to determine if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous exercise, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising to ice and rest the foot. It is advised that you then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Westland, MI.. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Stretch Your Feet

 

Contact Information

Dr. Kane & Associates, P.C.

35210 Nankin Blvd., Suite 301
Westland, MI 48185
Nankin Professional Center
(1 Block North of Westland Mall)

Phone: 734-525-2555
Fax: 734-525-0514  

Business Hours:

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday: Appointments Available
24-Hour Answering Service

Most Insurances Accepted